Ultrasound Technician Schools: Your Key to a Career in Sonography

When you start looking at ultrasound technician schools, you will find out that diagnostic medical sonography is a highly sought after career. This position not only diagnoses conditions, but detects pregnancy. But their skills are not limited to pregnancy. Ultrasounds are used for other conditions as well.

Typically, ultrasound technician schools offer programs ranging from 24 to 48 months of training. At the conclusion of the program, the student has either an associates or a bachelors degree. If students already work in the health care field, they can participate in a one-year certificate program. These programs can be found at junior colleges and technical schools pretty affordably. But there are also programs at the sonography and radiology departments of major universities. Students study a science-heavy curriculum, which will include classes like anatomy & physiology, basic physics, instrumentation, radiology, patient care, medical ethics, and ultrasound principles.

There will also be clinical classes, which take place at an actual medical setting.

The focus of ultrasound technician schools is to provide students with practical, hands-on experience and knowledge. Everything the student learns can be immediately applied on the job—on the first day! Diagnostic medical sonographers work in clinics, hospitals, and diagnostic imaging centers.

Students learn various specialties in the field of diagnostic sonography. Breast sonography, neurosonography (which is focused on the nervous system and the brain), obstetric and gynecological sonography, cardiac sonography, abdominal sonography (which focuses on pancreas, spleen, liver, kidneys, and male reproductive system), and vascular sonography (which focuses on the circulatory system).

Sonography touches nearly every specialty within the medical field. Diagnostic sonography is quickly becoming the diagnostic tool doctors turn to first.

Sonography uses sound waves, which bounce off the part of the body that is being targeted for diagnostic answers. The equipment used during the process captures the echoes created and turns them into images that can then be read by a physician trained in examining those images. This non-invasive means of getting answers regarding patient symptoms and conditions is a preferred method of diagnosis.

Sonographers not only run the machines, but they also explain the procedure to the patient. They must calm the patient and reassure them, while positioning them for the best pictures possible. The sonographer helps find the initial indicators of illness and disease, as well as get the best images possible for the doctor.

Diagnostic medical sonography is a rewarding and fast-growing field. Gaining employment should be fairly easy with the proper credentials and training. The education needed can be gained in a relatively short period of time. The field allows you to help patients get answers to their concerns and questions and provide reassurance. Many people enjoy their jobs as sonographers.

When you are picking out ultrasound technician schools, ask the following questions about the program:

Accrediation—is the school accredited?
Class size—how many students per class?
Focus—is the school focused on practical experience or learning?
Success of graduates from the program